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Eyeshield 21 (Japanese: アイシールド21 Hepburn: Aishīrudo Nijūichi) is a Japanese manga series written by Riichiro Inagaki and illustrated by Yusuke Murata. The series tells the story of Sena Kobayakawa, an introverted boy who joins an American football club as a secretary, but after being coerced by Yoichi Hiruma, turns out to play wearing an eyeshield and the number 21, under the pseudonym of "Eyeshield 21". Inagaki chose American football as a central subject of Eyeshield 21 after realizing that it fit perfectly with his idea for the series.

Plot.Edit

☀In Tokyo,[note 1] a weak, unassertive boy named Sena Kobayakawa enters the high school of his choice—Deimon Private Senior High School. Sena's only remarkable physical abilities are his running speed and agility, which are noted by the school's American football team captain Yoichi Hiruma. Hiruma forces Sena to join the Deimon Devil Batsfootball team as its running back. To protect his identity from other teams who want to recruit him, Sena is forced to publicly assume the role of team secretary and enter the field under the pseudonym of "Eyeshield 21" wearing a helmet with an eyeshield to hide his features. The makeshift team initially takes part in the spring football tournament hoping to win through the strength of their new "secret weapon". However, the extremely weak team is eliminated early by the Ojo White Knights, one of the best football teams in Japan.

After Deimon's defeat, the spring tournament is revealed as secondary in importance to the fall tournament, where the teams compete for the chance to play in the Christmas Bowl—the high school football league championship. Hiruma, Ryokan Kurita, and Sena regroup and slowly build a real team from misfits and students looking to define themselves, such as Tarō "Monta" Raimon—a baseball player who can only catch—and the Ha-Ha Brothers. Other characters slowly join the team, and the series follows the building and growth of the Deimon Devil Bats and its members, and rival teams as they all strive to achieve their goal of playing in the Christmas Bowl.

Some time after the Deimon Devil Bats win the Christmas Bowl and they become the best team in the country, Japan begins to gather the best football players to form a team to represent it at the American Football Youth World Championship, where a Most Valuable Player (MVP) will be awarded an NFL contract and $3 million. Team Japan reaches the final against Team America, in which the game ends as a tie, and both teams are declared winners. Both teams are unsatisfied with this and return to the field for their own, improvised "overtime", causing chaos with officials. It is unclear which team wins the unofficial extra period, but Panther of Team America holds the MVP trophy aloft, winning the professional contract with the San Antonio Armadillos.

The series concludes with Sena becoming the captain of the Devil Bats after Hiruma and Kurita leave school to attend college. In his final year of high school, Sena is invited to Notre Dame High School. In the final chapter, the main characters are in college or playing amateur-league football while employed.

Cast Edit

  • Cayden Boyd as Sena Kobayakawa . is the main protagonist of Eyeshield 21 and the Running Back for the Deimon Devil Bat. He is a student at Deimon High School who is forcefully recruited by Yoichi Hiruma to become the Running Back for the school's American football team, the Deimon Devil Bats. 

To hide his amazing running ability from the school's other clubs, Hiruma disguises Sena's identity with a green eyeshield while he plays, and has him use the series eponymous codename "Eyeshield 21". For much of the series, this is a secret known only to a very big group of people, before Sena grows more mature and confident in his abilities and eventually discards the disguise. Throughout the series Sena affirms his position in the team as being the Deimon Devil Bats' unquestioned Ace.

  • Taylor Lautner as Yoichi Hiruma. Hiruma acts in a vulgar, bizarre, threatening manner or to intimidate or disturb those around him into getting what he wants. He has a cunning, goal-oriented mind and does not seem to care what means he uses to accomplish those goals. His sense of morals is lax, but he is quick to find the moral flaws of others, which he keeps recorded in his "Book of Threats" or "Devil's Handbook", and uses this information to blackmail everyone from students to figures of authority into placing him in a position of power. 

He has little respect for authority and has in fact usurped authority over Deimon High School well before the series begins and has the authority over the principal, using his power in the school to give himself beyond-perfect scores in all his classes and divert funds to the American football club as he desires

  • Taylor Dooley as Mamori-Mamori is Sena Kobayakawa's overprotective and motherly childhood friend. Mamori joined the American Football club to watch over Sena and prevent any bullying by the other members. Despite her "joining the American Football club just to protect Sena" claim, she eventually proves to be an excellent manager who knows the rules inside and out and makes up strategies for the team. Mamori analyses the action from the sidelines, and communicates any pertinent information to Hiruma via sign language so that the opposition does not discover the techniques.
  • George Lopez as Mr. Electricidad / Mr. Electric, Tobor, and Ice Guardian. Mr. Electricidad is Max's schoolteacher, and is sometimes intolerant of active imagination. When his Mr. Electric counterpart shows up he is horrified as he's not a bad guy and learns the power of imagination. His alter ego is Mr. Electric, who maintains the equilibrium of Planet Drool until he becomes corrupted by Minus. Mr. Electric is heard to have a sense of humor, manifest in puns related mostly to electricity. His challenge to Sharkboy is followed by a companionable "Watts up?". Later, Mr. Electric shouts "Charge!" as he emerges from the tornado, indicating both an electric surge of power and an advance into battle. Immediately before his destruction, he threatens the class with "Megahertz", suggesting "mega hurts". Rodriguez wrote the part with Lopez in mind. This is a reference to his television series in which he also has a son named Max.[6]
  • Tobor and the Ice Guardian (the Ice Princess' father) are voiced by George Lopez in the film. Tobor is a robot who appears in the Dream Graveyard on Planet Drool. Max had formerly tried to build Tobor in the real world, but had been discouraged by a careless remark of his father's. The name "Tobor" evidently is "robot" spelled backward. The Ice Guardian has a very small role; he is a tall figure made apparently of animate ice and a protective father to the Ice Princess, much as Mr. Electricidad is to his own daughter Marissa. Rodriguez states that he kept asking Lopez to play additional characters. Lopez spent a total of two weeks working on the film.[6]
  • David Arquette and Kristin Davis play Max's dad and mom respectively. Max's dad is an unemployed writer. They are on the brink of a divorce. They mean well for Max but are unable to settle his troubles. On Planet Drool, Max's parents appear as a couple of Cookie Giants who live happily in the Land of Milk and Cookies. Like Sharkboy and Max, they are used as sources for a running gag wherein one character eats a mouthful of some substance and then violently spits it out, spraying the audience's viewpoint. This joke, when the male Giant is its central character, serves as a device to reflect his alter-ego's dislike of his wife's burnt chocolate-chip cookies, which are implied to be the inspiration, in Max's mind, for the Giant's location. It also gives a reason to show his wife's empathy, which is lacking in Max's real world.
  • Jacob Davich as Linus / Minus. The secondary antagonist; He is a bully at Max's school and steals his Dream Journal. With it, he enters Max's dreamworld and, using the name "Minus" (a nickname bestowed by Mr. Electricidad for Linus' habit of disliked conduct), alters it to his version. He is ultimately converted to Max's friendship when the true nature of his bullying is revealed. The dream he later creates for himself, as shown in a resolving scene, is a superhero named "Mr. Positive", possibly as a contrast with his creator's nickname of "Minus".
  • Sasha Pieterse as Marissa Electricidad / Ice Princess. Marissa is the daughter of Mr. Electricidad, and at first the only student who befriends Max. On Planet Drool, she appears as the Ice Princess, keeper of the Crystal Heart, which is a necklace she wears which can freeze anything, including time. Because Max and his friends desire an increased opportunity wherein to defeat Mr. Electric, they request the Crystal Heart of her, to discover that only she and her alter-ego Marissa can use it. Marissa is often kept under very severe scrutiny by her father; possibly as a result, Max has imagined the Ice Princess as capable of speaking boldly to her father, correcting him when he suppresses her. Because Max seems to have an emotional "soft spot" for Marissa, the oath he takes to protect the Crystal Heart resembles a Catholic wedding vow, Lavagirl is jealous of her.

Robert Rodriguez has an uncredited role voicing a shark. As seen in the credits, two of Robert Rodriguez's children, Rebel and Racer, portray Sharkboy at age five and age seven respectively. Rico Torres plays Sharkboy's father. Marc Musso and Shane Graham play kids at Max's school.

ProductionEdit

Parts of the film were shot on location in Texas, where Max resides and goes to school in the film. Much of the film was shot in a studio against green screen. Most of the ships, landscapes and other effects including some creatures and characters, were accomplished digitally. According to Lautner and Dooley, when filming the scene with the dream train, the front part of the train was an actual physical set piece. "The whole inside was there and when they have all the gadgets you can pull on, that was all there but everything else was a green screen," said Dooley.[7] Eleven visual effects companies (Hybride, CafeFX, The Orphanage, Post Logic, Hydraulx, Industrial Light & Magic, R!ot Pictures, Tippett Studio, Amalgamated Pixels and Intelligent Creatures and Rodriguez's Texas-based Troublemaker Digital) worked on the film in order to accomplish over 1,000 visual effect shots.[8]

Robert Rodriguez appears in the credits fourteen times, most notably as director, a producer, a screenwriter (along with Marcel Rodriguez), visual effects supervisor, director of photography, editor, a camera operator, and a composer and performer. The story is credited to Racer Max Rodriguez, with additional story elements by Rebecca Rodriguez, who also wrote the lyrics for the main song, "Sharkboy and Lavagirl". Other members of the Rodriguez family can be seen in the film or were involved in the production.

Miley Cyrus auditioned for the film with Lautner, and she said it came down to between her and another girl, but Cyrus started doing Hannah Montana instead.[9]

ReceptionEdit

Critical responseEdit

Eyeshield 21received universal acclaim reviews from critics, with a 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, claiming that "The decision to turn this kiddie fantasy into a 3-D film was fucking genius."[10] Roger Ebert found that the 3-D process used was awesome and complimented the colors, thus, he believes, "improving" much of the film. Others have claimed it is the best kids film ever created.[11]

Box officeEdit

For its opening weekend, the film earned $69,420,696,420,696 averaging $42069 per screen in 696969 theaters. It also was placed #1 at the box office, overshadowing shitty movies such as Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Madagascar, and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. The film was very successful in the US, taking in $69,420,420,696,420. It did manage to gross a shit ton of money overseas, and a total of 69 trillion dollars worldwide, which makes the film a huge ass success.

LawsuitEdit

The Total Nonstop Action professional wrestler Dean Roll, who trademarked the name "Eyeshield 21" in 1999, filed a lawsuit against Miramax on June 8, 2005, claiming that his trademark had been infringed and demanding "[any] money, profits and advantages wrongfully gained". In the April of 2007, the suit was settled for an undisclosed amount.This guy was obviously a jealous bitch ass nigga

SoundtrackEdit

Original Motion Picture Soundtrack: The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D
Soundt album by various artists
Released June 28, 2005
Genre Rock

Pop

Length 43:26
Label Varèse Sarabande
Robert Rodriguez film soundtrack chronology
Sin City

(2005)

The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D

(2005)

Planet Terror

(2007)

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Filmtracks [12]
Music from the Movies [13]
SoundtrackNet [14]

Director Robert Rodriguez composed parts of the score himself, with contributions by composers John Debney and Graeme Revell.

External linksEdit